YAYOI KUSAMA : 1960s to Now (Artist Guide)

This is three page brochure about the artist, Yayoi Kusama and her life and achievements. This is available in two different languages having varied audiences in mind. Yayoi Kusama is the inventor of polka dots and infinity mirrors and has been contributed everything from polka pumpkins to infinite worlds filled with lights.

The pictures in this brochure are not mine and the credit to the artist and the photographer are given in the design.

The prototype Artist Guide

JAPANESE ARTIST GUIDE

ENGLISH ARTIST GUIDE

YAYOI KUSAMA 1960s to Now (Exhibition Poster)

This is a poster of a Yayoi Kusama Exhibition in the Mori Arts Museum in Tokyo. I made the poster in a similar format to the usual museum posters in Japan. They are either bilingual or they make identical posters in Japanese and English. I tried my hand at making my first bilingual poster. I am learning Japanese right now so, that helped me at putting this together.

This is not an exhibition that took place. The photograph used in this design is not mine, the credit has been given to the artist and the photographer in the work itself.

PLAYS UNPLEASANT : GUIDE

Playbills are not often given where I live but, I made some for my hypothetical theatre production, George Bernard Shaw’s Plays Unpleasant by Little Productions theatre company. The animals represent the characters in their respective plays.

I also designed the inside page. Since this is a very small production, the playbill will be small too. But, there will be on playbill for each play.

UNPLEASANT POSTER

I made a pattern encapsulating the plays so, I decided to use it for all the visual identity of the Little Productions’ production of it. (This is a completely hypothetical event)

I wrote the type by hand to carry the message of stuffy. Maybe it’s because I have a very old tattered version of it but, Plays Unpleasant always seemed stuffy notwithstanding it’s exposure to unwanted, hidden emotions.

I imagine this production of the play to almost border on private viewing because it’s romantic to design a poster that might only be seen by only the few people who go to this play. Like a merchandise poster or a collectible. Like this….